come alive

A year ago, I climbed Masada, walked through Jericho, and ate icecream in the blistering humidity that Israel calls autumn.

More than anything else, I became vividly aware that Scripture is alive — in and around me, as it is reflected off this harsh landscapes with its hidden treasures of milk and honey.

God’s Word is alive and working and is sharper than a double-edged sword. It cuts all the way into us, where the soul and the spirit are joined, to the center of our joints and bones. And it judges the thoughts and feelings in our hearts.

Hebrews 4:12
Qumran, Dead Sea

I’m growing increasingly appreciative of the Jewish people, their stubbornness, their devotion, and the richness of their journey as a people and a nation.

When Saul persecuted David, he and his mighty men sought refuge at the desert oasis of Ein Gedi.

everywhere I go, I’m wrapped in Scripture, and more than ever, I am convinced that the Word is God, that the Word is living and active, that the Word is made manifest in us and through us, and that it is impossible to live life without Him.

to me, it’s not so much about following in Jesus’s footprints, as it is the realisation that Holy Spirit inside us is the Hope of Glory.

Jericho, Palestine
Jericho, Palestine

So faith comes by hearing [what is told], and what is heard comes by the preaching [of the message that came from the lips] of Christ (the Messiah Himself).

Romans 10:17
Masada, Israel

#runwildlivefree

Masada is a fortress in the middle of the Judean desert.
if you’re anything like me, you don’t put “refuge” and “desert” in the same sentence.
there are obvious strategic and tactical benefits to hiding out in a place of isolation, but if the aim is survival, odds are, if your enemy won’t survive, neither will you.
at least, this was my train of thought as the desert sun beat down relentlessly, sealing in the heat reflecting off of the Dead Sea.
Masada is from the Hebrew, מצדה‬ metsada, which means “fortress”.
among the ruins are remnants of Herod’s palace, and the place is famously known for it’s ability to provide strategic defence.
the cliffs to the East are 400m high, and toward the West, 90m.
if you’re the adventurous kind, you can climb the zig-zagging snake path leading to the top.
or, take the cable car, and escape the heat (sort of). the top of Masada is a mesa-like plateau which provided ample space for the building of palaces, storage rooms, barracks, and most importantly — cisterns to catch up and contain flash floods.
aside from all the drama between the Romans and the Jews, Masada is also known as the last stand where Sicari rebels committed suicide (which is forbidden in Judaism), rather than facing captivity and slavery.
the desolation of this desert fortress, and the determination of the people who found refuge in it, opened up a new understanding of the Israeli people and the harsh spiritual and physical climate in which they need to survive.

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